Pregnant Women Receiving Detailed Information On Prenatal Testing Less Likely To Undergo Those Tests

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349676

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INTRO: Today, there are several different prenatal tests that can help determine whether or not a child will be born with a genetic problem like Down syndrome. Many of these tests are expensive and some are invasive. A new study evaluated whether providing detailed information about these tests and also providing the tests at no cost to women, would affect the decision to undergo testing. Catherine Dolf has more in this week’s JAMA Report. VIDEO AUDIO B-ROLL Ultrasound of fetus FOR MOST PREGNANT WOMEN, IT IS EXCITING TO LEARN THEY ARE EXPECTING. SOT/FULL Rachel Freyre - Expectant Mom Super@:04 Runs:03 “Super excited…me and the dad are ecstatic.” B-ROLL Pregnant woman sitting at desk WHAT COMES NEXT IS A LOT OF NEW INFORMATION, INCLUDING WHETHER OR NOT TO UNDERGO PRENATAL TESTING. SOT/FULL Miriam Kuppermann, Ph.D., M.P.H., - University of California, San Francisco Super@:11 Runs:09 “There are many prenatal tests out there that can help women understand whether they might be giving birth to a child with a genetic problem.” SOT/FULL Mary E. Norton, M.D., - University of California, San Francisco Super@:20 Runs:06 “The important thing is to really understand what the test is and why you are having it.” B-ROLL Dr. Norton and Dr. Kuppermann walking down hall, Rachel looking at screen and talking with Dr. Kuppermann, cu of decision guide playing DOCTORS MIRIAM KUPPERMANN AND MARY NORTON FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA SAN FRANCISCO AND CO-AUTHORS DEVELOPED A COMPUTERIZED DECISION SUPPORT GUIDE CONTAINING DETAILED INFORMATION ABOUT PRENATAL TESTING. SOT/FULL Miriam Kuppermann, Ph.D., M.P.H., - University of California, San Francisco Super@ :40 Runs:07 (Video covering 1st part of bite: decision support guide page) “It contains information about Down syndrome and the other conditions for which testing is available.” B-ROLL Various shots of Rachel and Dr. Kuppermann looking at decision guide MORE THAN 700 HUNDRED PREGNANT WOMEN WERE RECRUITED FROM VARYING ETHNIC AND SOCIOECONOMIC BACKGROUNDS. HALF VIEWED THE COMPUTERIZED VIDEO … NATSO/FULL Runs: 03 “…problems with chromosomes are one cause of birth defects…” B-ROLL Various shots of decision support guide …AND WERE THEN OFFERED PRENATAL TESTING FREE-OF-CHARGE. THE OTHER HALF DID NOT SEE THE DECISION SUPPORT GUIDE AND WERE NOT OFFERED FREE TESTS. SOT/FULL Mary E. Norton, M.D., - University of California, San Francisco Super@1:01 Runs:08 “The tests give more and more information and for some women more information is not necessarily what they want.” SOT/FULL Miriam Kuppermann, Ph.D., M.P.H., - University of California, San Francisco Super@ 1:12 Runs:15 (Video covering 2nd half of the bite: decision support guide) “Women who had the opportunity to view the program were less likely to undergo diagnostic testing than women who did not have a study intervention. They better understood prenatal testing and its outcomes.” GXF FULL JAMA COVER THE STUDY APPEARS IN JAMA, JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION. SOT/FULL Miriam Kuppermann, Ph.D., M.P.H., - University of California, San Francisco Super@ 1:28 Runs:10 “They also were more likely to correctly estimate the chances that their baby would have Down syndrome or that an amniocentesis could cause a miscarriage.” SOT/FULL Rachel Freyre - Expectant Mom Super@ 1:38 Runs:09 “It did help me figure out exactly what testing option I wanted to go with and I felt better about it just because I knew exactly what I’m being tested for.” SOT/FULL Mary E. Norton, M.D., - University of California, San Francisco Super@ 1:47 Runs:09 “It’s really important that women understand that it’s their choice to make and what the implications are of making a choice one way or the other.” B-ROLL Dr. Norton and Dr. Kuppermann looking at ultrasound CATHERINE DOLF, THE JAMA REPORT. TAG: ALL THE WOMEN PARTICIPATING IN THE STUDY HAD NOT YET UNDERGONE ANY PRENATAL TESTING FOR CHROMOSOMAL PROBLEMS. Please see the complete study for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc. TO CONTACT: Dr. Miriam Kuppermann and Dr. Mary Norton call: Elizabeth Fernandez at (415) 514-1592 doi.10.1001/jama.2014.11479 ADDITIONAL SOUNDBITES: Miriam Kuppermann, Ph.D., M.P.H., - University of California, San Francisco QUOTE 1 Runs :27 “It goes through a lot of information about the tests that are offered. It emphasizes that every woman has three choices all of which are completely legitimate and based almost entirely on her values and preferences. And the choices of course are to have no prenatal testing at all, to start with a screening test or go straight to invasive diagnostic testing.” Mary E. Norton, M.D., - University of California, San Francisco QUOTE 1 Runs :19 “Often what happens is testing becomes routinized, testing is just done routinely and a high percentage of women have testing without completely understanding why. So we have come to appreciate that when women are given very good detailed information they often choose not to have testing.”
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