Almost Half of Patients Receive at Least One Antibiotic While Hospitalized

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349656

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INTRO: Antibiotics continue to save countless lives every day. However, unnecessary use of these medications can contribute to the development of antibiotic resistant infections. A new study examined antibiotic prescribing practices in a cross-section of U-S hospitals to see how common antibiotic use is, what type of antibiotics are being used, and why. Catherine Dolf explains in this week’s JAMA Report. SOT/FULL Shelley S. Magill, M.D., Ph.D., - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Super@:01 Runs:03 “Antibiotics are critically, critically important drugs.” SOT/FULL Scott K. Fridkin, M.D., - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Super@:04 Runs:16 (Video covering end of bite: stacks of medication, slides being looked at under microscope) “Very powerful antibiotics are being used in situations you wouldn’t normally expect them to be used, which suggests there’s probably room for improvement to eliminate unnecessary antibiotic use. Unnecessary antibiotic use is one of the key drivers for the development of antibiotic resistant infections.” B-ROLL Dr. Magill and Dr. Fridkin walking down hallway, sitting at table looking at study, various shots of staff working in hospital DOCTORS SHELLEY MAGILL AND SCOTT FRIDKIN FROM THE CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION AND CO-AUTHORS CONDUCTED A CROSS-SECTIONAL SURVEY OF 183 U-S HOSPITALS. FROM MAY THRU SEPTEMBER OF 2011, EACH HOSPITAL SELECTED A SPECIFIC DAY TO REPORT ON WHAT TYPE OF ANTIBIOTICS HOSPITALIZED PATIENTS WERE RECEIVING. SOT/FULL Shelley S. Magill, M.D., Ph.D., - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Super@:41 Runs:08 (Video covering 1st part of bite: patient in hospital bed) “One out of every two patients that were surveyed was on an antibiotic. About half of all the patients on antibiotics were getting two or more antibiotics.” GXF FULL JAMA COVER THE STUDY APPEARS IN JAMA, JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION. SOT/FULL Shelley S. Magill, M.D., Ph.D., - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Super@ :48 Runs:11 (Video covering middle of bite: woman in pharmacy filling prescriptions) “The very most common drug overall was a drug called vancomycin. When we looked at the most common antibiotics that patients were getting we did find that they tended to be what we call broad spectrum antibiotic drugs. B-ROLL Antibiotics in refrigerators, doctor in room with patient, surgery, lab worker BROAD SPECTRUM ANTIBIOTICS, WHICH ARE USED TO TREAT MORE RESISTANT INFECTIONS, WERE NOT ONLY GIVEN TO PATIENTS IN THE INTENSIVE CARE UNIT BUT PRESCRIBED COMMONLY IN REGULAR MEDICAL AND SURGICAL UNITS AND ALSO FOR INFECTIONS THAT BEGAN OUTSIDE THE HOSPITAL, IN THE COMMUNITY. SOT/FULL Super @1:13 Runs:10 Scott K. Fridkin, M.D., - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention “The line has really been blurred between reserving these powerful antibiotics for patients that have health care acquired infections and those that have community based infections.” SOT/FULL Shelley S. Magill, M.D., Ph.D., - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Super@ 1:22 Runs:07 “That might be an opportunity to look more carefully to see if there are ways in which use could be improved in those specific settings.” B-ROLL Exterior of the CDC, Dr. Fridkin and Magill talking with staff person TO HELP ACCOMPLISH THIS, LAST MARCH THE C-D-C ASKED EVERY U-S HOSPITAL TO IMPLEMENT AN ANTIBIOTIC STEWARDSHIP PROGRAM. SOT/FULL Scott K. Fridkin, M.D., - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Super@1:44 Runs:14 (Video covering 1st part of bite: doctor on computer, looking through patient information, people working in pharmacy) “Having a stewardship program that’s got leadership, accountability, drug expertise monitoring and tracking, that’s a program that can make a difference for all the providers that prescribe antibiotics in hospitals in the US.” B-ROLL Dr. Fridkin on camera CATHERINE DOLF, THE JAMA REPORT. TAG: STUDY AUTHORS SAY THIS SURVEY PROVIDES A FOUNDATION TO HOSPITALS FOR ASSESSING OPPORTUNITIES TO IMPROVE ANTIBIOTIC USE. Please see the complete study for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc. TO CONTACT: Dr. Shelley Magill and Dr. Scott Fridkin call: Melissa Brower at (404) 639-4718 doi.10.1001/jama.2014.12923 ADDITIONAL SOUNDBITES: Shelley S. Magill, M.D., Ph.D., - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention QUOTE 1 Runs :15 “This information allows providers in hospitals to look overall at antibiotic use and see where antibiotics are being used most commonly in the hospital, for what reason and those could be areas to target for improving antibiotic use.” Scott K. Fridkin, M.D., - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention QUOTE 1 Runs:14 “Antibiotics are a precious resource, they’re lifesaving drugs. However, we’re at risk for losing their effectiveness and at risk for losing them for our generation and future generations if we don’t act now to preserve their effectiveness.”
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